Nose ticklers

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Nose ticklers

During this play you can help teach baby about his body by doing the following: Get baby’s attention by holding a length of colourful ribbon very close to his eyes and shaking it. Try moving the nose tickler up and down so baby can watch it go near and far. Prompt baby to move their head by moving the ribbon slowly out of sight. Touch the ribbon to different body.

Baby garden!

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Baby garden!

Spread a blanket out in the garden and spend some time with baby exploring the world around you. Pick some flowers and grass and tickle baby with them, or let her crawl and explore the ground by herself. Bring her attention to creepy crawlies and talk about being “gentle” with flowers and insects. If you’re feeling creative you can make some daisy chains for you and baby. You may be.

Visual development (babies)

Visual development (babies)

You’ve probably realised by now that your new baby is your No 1 fan as he gazes intently at your face when you cradle him or during feeding time. For the first month, he can focus only about 20cm to 30cm away. That’s just far enough to clearly make out the face of the person holding him. If you hold him close, he will find your face and expressions so.

Splash, splash, splash!

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Splash, splash, splash!

Need a distraction fast? Then get yourself and baby near some water as quick as you can! Half fill the sink with water, add some dishwashing liquid, whisk up some bubbles and you have made yourself an attractive, sensory activity for baby to observe. The noise of your hands splashing in the water is very soothing and the look of the bubbles is a winner with all babies. You can.

Tags of fun!

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Tags of fun!

Babies seem to get the best enjoyment out of the most ordinary things. Tags and labels on clothes are no exception to this rule. Make them their very own tag cloth for hours of fun. You’ll need brightly coloured and textured ribbons (make sure the ribbons are wide enough for baby to play with and are not too thin), needle and thread, scissors and a soft face cloth. Cut the.

Gross motor development (babies)

Gross motor development (babies)

In one of our PlayLabs recently a mum was saying how her football-mad husband sometimes dashes home from work for “kick-off time” – and no, this doesn’t mean watching his team playing in the Premiership, rather their three-month-old boy on his playmat. Dad puts baby on the mat and oohs and aaahs as his son reaches out with his arms and legs, usually with a baby gym overhead. To mum.

Balloon play

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Balloon play

Babies learn best in the first six months through the visual world around them. This is why they seem to pay so much attention to objects that move, are colourful, or make funny sounds. They will spend longer than older children being stimulated by what they see, so make use of this interest by using the humble balloon. Blow up a nice colourful bunch of balloons (a single colour will.

Body awareness (babies)

Body awareness (babies)

We’ve all been there, it’s evening time and you’re busy trying to prepare dinner, sort the laundry, answer the phone and check emails – taking multi-tasking motherhood to new levels. As you’re dashing about the house, baby emits an ear-piercing cry from the cot. Luckily daddy has just arrived home and scoops her up. He talks to her soothingly and swaddles her in a soft blanket. As he rocks her.

Drop it!

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Drop it!

Picking up toys and dropping them again is fascinating for babies. Not only does the game provide long stretches of entertainment for babies (have you ever seen a baby tire of the “put it in and take it out again” game?) but the skills involved in picking up and letting go of an object are very important. Selecting an object or toy of interest requires a lot of concentration from.

Hand-eye coordination (babies)

Hand-eye coordination (babies)

It’s a sunny day and you’re feeling a sense of achievement that you’ve made it around the supermarket without too much baby drama. As you’re placing baby back in her car seat, a sudden hand swipe catches you by surprise and your favourite sunglasses clatter to the ground. Yes, your baby’s hand-eye coordination has really come on – as you pick up the bits of your designer glasses! As baby.