Body awareness (babies)

Body awareness (babies)

We’ve all been there, it’s evening time and you’re busy trying to prepare dinner, sort the laundry, answer the phone and check emails – taking multi-tasking motherhood to new levels. As you’re dashing about the house, baby emits an ear-piercing cry from the cot. Luckily daddy has just arrived home and scoops her up. He talks to her soothingly and swaddles her in a soft blanket. As he rocks her.

I can dress myself

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I can dress myself

Here comes Mr/Miss Independent! Lay out a selection of your little one’s clothes and challenge him to have a go at dressing himself. Yes it’s a tricky task, but they get a lot of satisfaction from giving it a go, so encourage all efforts! To up his odds of succeeding, omit any difficult clothing items and stick with simple things like socks, mittens, hats and large sweaters. My little one.

Floor fun!

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Floor fun!

Crawling (or at least trying to crawl) is a very exciting time for babies and you can encourage this fun and interest in the new world around him by letting him explore different textures. Gather a few different textured large items such as a clean welcome door mat, bath mat, towel and fleecy blanket and let him crawl across each surface. Crawl with your baby and describe each surface as.

Stand up!

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Stand up!

Here is a fun way to make the most out of baby’s fast disappearing grasp reflex and encourage her back and leg muscle development too. Place baby on her back on a soft and non-slip surface, such as the carpeted floor or a rug. While you sit at her feet, encourage baby to grasp your fingers. As she does, use your own hands to hold on nice and tight and.

Opera time!

Opera time!

Babies love to hear singing, especially their mama’s singing. Experts suggest that narrating what you’re doing helps build baby’s language skills. So, why not combine the singing and the narrating and make an opera of your everyday activities? You may feel silly at first, but baby will love it! “Now, we’re going down the stairs! Oh no, where did I put my keys? Here they are!” If you’re feeling a.

How to survive Halloween with your toddler

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How to survive Halloween with your toddler

Halloween can be a bit too scary and overwhelming for our toddlers and pre-schoolers so it’s important to make light of the scary-themed symbols. Running our ClapHandies PlayLabs gives us a great opportunity to try out activities with our toddlers and hear what works for other parents. Here are some not-so-spooky activities for you to enjoy together. Gooey Play – The gooey squishy insides of pumpkins make a great sensory.

Gross motor development (babies)

Gross motor development (babies)

In one of our PlayLabs recently a mum was saying how her football-mad husband sometimes dashes home from work for “kick-off time” – and no, this doesn’t mean watching his team playing in the Premiership, rather their three-month-old boy on his playmat. Dad puts baby on the mat and oohs and aaahs as his son reaches out with his arms and legs, usually with a baby gym overhead. To mum.

My day album

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My day album

With a little bit of preparation and planning, you can make a book that is all about your little person! As you know, little ones LOVE to read, love to be read to, and even simply love to look at a book someone else happens to be reading! An individualised story will entertain and fascinate your child. Spend some time over a typical day (or week) taking photos of your.

Instant blocks

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Instant blocks

Don’t have a set of blocks handy at Grandma’s house? The lovely yet ancient china tea set is starting to look a bit too tempting to your curious child? Don’t worry! Have a good look around you for lightweight hardcover books (not the special ones), tissue boxes, plastic square tubs with lids, shoe boxes, cardboard boxes, cereal boxes are good, provided you take the contents out first and anything else.

Visual development (babies)

Visual development (babies)

You’ve probably realised by now that your new baby is your No 1 fan as he gazes intently at your face when you cradle him or during feeding time. For the first month, he can focus only about 20cm to 30cm away. That’s just far enough to clearly make out the face of the person holding him. If you hold him close, he will find your face and expressions so.