Talk to me!

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Talk to me!

Busy mums and dads can often forget the simple fact that talking to babies is easily the most important thing you can do. Especially when baby is on the verge of a meltdown, a simple chit-chat and cuddle is often all they need. When outside, talk to baby about what you see and hear – anything from the noisy bus to the magpies squabbling in the trees. Babies just love.

Peek-a-boo bells!

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Peek-a-boo bells!

Find a toy with a bell, or make a bracelet with bells (make sure you use bells that are big enough so baby won’t choke on them). Find a nice comfortable spot for both you and baby on the floor and surround him with a variety of hiding places for the bells, such as soft toys, upside down nesting cups, cushions and blankets. Hold up the bells for your baby.

Mouth mirror music

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Mouth mirror music

Playing mouth games together with your little one in front of a mirror helps teach them about all the interesting things your lips can do. It also shows them that our mouths produce different sounds, which is highly entertaining! Blow raspberries, make kissing sounds, whistle, click your tongue and whirr your lips. Or why not go all out and be the rap star you’ve always wanted to be – you’ll.

Hide and seek

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Hide and seek

Here is a simple version of hide and seek that is perfect for younger children. Choose a room with lots of potential hiding spots (such as the dining room or sitting room) and start hiding! When you find a place to hide, like under the kitchen table, say in a loud voice, “Where am I hiding? Where has mummy gone? Can you see me?” Wait a moment or two in.

Nose ticklers

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Nose ticklers

During this play you can help teach baby about his body by doing the following: Get baby’s attention by holding a length of colourful ribbon very close to his eyes and shaking it. Try moving the nose tickler up and down so baby can watch it go near and far. Prompt baby to move their head by moving the ribbon slowly out of sight. Touch the ribbon to different body.

Splash, splash, splash!

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Splash, splash, splash!

Need a distraction fast? Then get yourself and baby near some water as quick as you can! Half fill the sink with water, add some dishwashing liquid, whisk up some bubbles and you have made yourself an attractive, sensory activity for baby to observe. The noise of your hands splashing in the water is very soothing and the look of the bubbles is a winner with all babies. You can.

Balloon play

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Balloon play

Babies learn best in the first six months through the visual world around them. This is why they seem to pay so much attention to objects that move, are colourful, or make funny sounds. They will spend longer than older children being stimulated by what they see, so make use of this interest by using the humble balloon. Blow up a nice colourful bunch of balloons (a single colour will.

Start and stop!

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Start and stop!

This is a great twist on the classic game of good old musical chairs. You can use your computer to play music or your smartphone, or simply sing. Start the music or singing and dance around the room with your baby in your arms for about thirty seconds. Then suddenly stop singing or pause the music and freeze on the spot. Hold the freeze for a few seconds then start.

Play with bells and chimes

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Play with bells and chimes

This can be a lovely way to distract a fussing baby. Leave some handy chimes or bells around the house, or in the car. Glass or crystal, metal spoons, bells, a tuning fork, wind chimes or musical instruments will all have the same effect. When your little one is feeling a little tired and is perhaps close to tears, try using the chimes to distract them. Ring the bell, strike.

Let’s exercise

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Let’s exercise

It might seem that your little one has a never-ending supply of energy and enthusiasm, so have fun together in this structured exercise routine! Play some fun, rhythmic music and announce that it’s “exercise time” before you begin. Let your child mirror your simple bending and stretching movements like these: put your hands on your head, touch the floor (well, at least she will!), shake your hands way up high.